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look at some of the other countries and the policies that they have, excuse me. you can look at canada, united kingdom, australia, for example. they set up a scoring point system that reward people for being able to contribute to the host country. now, i have long said that the immigration policy in the united states of america should be designed to enhance the economic, social and cultural well-being of the united states. that should be actually the policy of any sovereign nation in the world, should establish an immigration policy for the purposes of enhancing the economic, social and cultural well-being that have particular sovereign state. in this case, it's the united states of america. we should also understand that one of the essential pillars of american exceptionalism is the rule of law. if we have contempt for the rule of law, if we have some of the highest profile people in america openly speak about hiring illegals to take care of their home and at the same time advocate for the dream act which is amnesty for a specific class of people, we regard -- reward for illegal behav
companies using these, especially in canada. i was wondering, on the state legislative side, is there anything we can do as an industry to help them work in the state-to-state level with one voice versus going individually state to state to try to get regulations that are written? all the states and to be moving toward this, but that a written more in compliance with what the national regulations that are being proposed and actually being brought out? is there any way that we can help to work with the states on that? thank you. >> well, i am not as familiar with the exact regulations you're talking about so far as the technology and the school buses. but so far as, you know, working with state legislators, again, i give you the invitation to contact me and talk directly with me. ncsl, on a whole, does not develop model legislation for states to adopt because, you know, the one size does not fit all, and we want to make sure states have flexibility in the way they approach legislation in their state. but i would at least welcome a conversation with you if there's an opportuni
in 1996. in fact the european union and others, including canada, australia, norway, japan and south korea have now imposed their own sanctions. virtually every western energy company has now agreed to cease sales of refined petroleum to iran and refrain from investments in iran's energy sector. following the passage, most banks in the united arab emirates, an portrayeding partner, stopped money transfers to iran. press reports have indicated sanctions have cut in half exports with dubai. south korean sanctions have suspended the iran bank in seoul. the bank is a known facilitator of iran's proliferation activities and south korea is iran's fourth largest trading parter. the impact is significant. based on our discussion with the korean government. the banks's operations have been shut down for good. japan have recently announced sanctions that target iranian entities and individuals of proliferation concern, including iranian banks, the islamic revolutionary guard corps and the iranian shipping lines. these sanctions, along with the prohibition on the transfer of proliferation-sensitive d
to keep his own job. as far as canada's goes in this country, the vast majority goes the vast majority have used -- pack as far as cannabis goes, the vast majority of us have used it. as far as afghanistan and opium, we saw on the news where our soldiers were guarding the poppy fields. we're using our tax dollars to guard the poppy fields. this is a joke. as far as the opium and cocaine, and do not know, that marijuana is not that bad. it should be legalized. i do not use it no more. it is not that big a deal. thank you. guest: 2 richard and all of the other callers, one of the great advantages of living in the american society is we can have this dialogue and you get to this dialogue and you get to speak your piece, but clearly i cannot change the laws and the united states. elected officials get paid to do that. as long as illegal and unlawful, something i believe is correct and we should not be making illegal, then we are duty bound to enforce the laws. respectfully, i would tell you to direct your comments to congress. host: what keeps you awake at night, what worries you the most
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4